10 Remote Work Statistics: Will This Trend Disappear or Remain in 2024?

Updated on December 27, 2023
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Andrea Mercado
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Remote work statistics

In the last three years, how we work has undergone a seismic shift, with remote work skyrocketing from 6% to over 50% during the pandemic, eventually settling around 28% since early 2023, as Harvard Business recently reported

But what do the polls say, and what is the outlook for the future? Stay with us and explore the latest 10 remote work statistics to watch out for in 2024.

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Remote Work Demographics

1. 12.7% of full-time employees work remotely in 2023

Remote and hybrid jobs have rapidly gained acceptance since 2020 but remain minority models for full-time employees in 2023. 

Forbes shows that 12.7% now work from home, demonstrating normalized remote roles across sectors.

Additionally, 28.2% of staff follow hybrid policies. This flexible approach allows physical interactions while avoiding daily commutes. Yet, at the same time, 59.1% still work entirely on traditional business premises. 

2. 39% of workers aged 24-35 are most likely to work remotely full-time

The younger workforce is at the forefront of the remote work shift, valuing the flexibility of working from anywhere as a critical factor in talent retention. 

Recent surveys indicate that 39% of workers aged 24-35 prefer full-time remote work, with an additional 25% opting for part-time remote jobs.

Compare this to professionals over 45 years old, seeing only 5% working remotely. Younger staff still establishing careers place a high priority on autonomy, enabled through leading remote employer policies.

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3. 38% of men work remotely full-time vs. 30% of women

Recent remote work surveys uncovered a gender divide in adoption, likely demanding additional policy focus on equitable inclusion. The data shows that 38% of men now work entirely remotely, topping the 30% rate among women.

With nearly a quarter of both groups also working hybrid models part-time remotely, a gap emerges favoring men in location flexibility. 

4. Over 50% of digital nomads are married or in a partnership

Contrary to popular belief, the digital nomad lifestyle is broader than single, young professionals. 

Forbes found that over half of the digital nomads (58.8%) are married or in a partnership, and nearly half (48.3%) have children under 18.

The picture highlights the versatility of the digital nomad lifestyle and how professionals of all ages and life stages can embrace it.

Remote Work Benefits Statistics

5. The preference for remote work equivalent to an 8% pay raise

The National Bureau of Economic Research surveyed over 30,000 Americans across multiple waves. The core question revolves around whether WFH (Work From Home) is here to stay and what drives this trend.

The data indicates an apparent inclination towards remote work, with employees valuing it almost as much as an 8% pay increase, on average.

This substantial amenity could significantly reduce turnover rates. One study published in 2023 links remote work to 35% lower turnover odds, which drives substantial retention impacts.

6. Full-time remote employees could save up to $12,000 annually

Working full-time remotely isn't just about convenience; it's also a money-saver. 

A study by Flexjobs found that full-time remote employees can save up to $12,000 annually. That adds up when you consider that the average commuter spends between $3,000 and $15,000 yearly on transportation.

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7. 71% of remote workers find work-life balance thanks to remote work 

Regarding work-life balance, a crucial aspect of employee well-being, remote work is making a positive impact. In a recent survey, 71% of remote workers stated that remote work helps balance their work and personal life.

However, it’s essential to acknowledge that 12% reported that it hurts their work-life balance, indicating that remote work may not suit everyone.

Understanding these preferences is vital for organizations designing their remote work policies. 

8. Remote work is linked to a 4% drop in burglaries in the UK

Amid remote work's ascent, broader societal impacts are coming to light - including significant effects on crime. Recently, studies analyzed granular crime data alongside neighborhood work-from-home adoption trends in the UK.

The results reveal a striking connection: a 4% burglary decrease corresponding to a standard deviation rise in residents working remotely.

This change accounted for over half the 30% burglary decline since 2019. Spatial variations also emerged in crime reduction between proximate areas with more and less remote work capacity.

Statistics on Disadvantages of Remote Working

9. Fully remote work is, on average, 10% less productive than onsite work

Harvard suggests fully remote roles see up to 10% less output than onsite ones, on average. However, considerable cost savings from slashed real estate and opened talent pools offset this decline.

Meanwhile, hybrid work, a mix of remote and onsite, shows varying effects on productivity depending on jobs and people, but on average, it has little impact or even increases productivity. 

10. Women face 47% more baseless remote work bias

Common biases also affect remote work, with women experiencing increased skepticism about their productivity.  

In a recent analysis of over 2,000 professionals published by The New York Times, men and women tend to suspect female colleagues of being distracted or lazy almost 50% more than men.

In the study, participants, when presented with empty desks in video footage, assumed women were absent for non-work reasons 47% of the time, compared to 34% for men.

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Summary: Remote Work Statistics

1. 12.7% of full-time employees work remotely in 2023

2. 39% of workers aged 24-35 are most likely to work remotely full-time

3. 38% of men work remotely full-time vs. 30% of women

4. Over 50% of digital nomads are married or in a partnership

5. The preference for remote work equivalent to an 8% pay raise

6. Full-time remote employees could save up to $12,000 annually

7. 71% of remote workers find work-life balance thanks to remote work

8. Remote work is linked to a 4% drop in burglaries in the UK

9. Fully remote work is, on average, 10% less productive than onsite work

10. Women face 47% more baseless remote work bias

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Photo by LinkedIn Sales Solutions on Unsplash

FAQ

Does remote work impact job satisfaction?

According to Forbes, in early 2023, 93% of remote workers reported increased job satisfaction. As reported by the survey, 44% of respondents mentioned that their mental health had improved since adopting remote work, and 61% felt less stressed while working remotely.

How do employees view financial trade-offs for remote work?

Some reports shared by Forbes show that 32% of hybrid workers are willing to accept a pay cut in exchange for the opportunity to work remotely full-time. That emphasizes the significant value workers place on the flexibility and autonomy provided by remote work.

Does remote work impact housing affordability?

Some U.S. economists suggest that remote work could positively impact housing affordability. 

A recent study, using data from rent fluctuations and construction insights, predicts potential rent effects due to remote and hybrid work.

While the pandemic initially caused a temporary rent increase as remote workers moved away from expensive housing markets, economists expect rents to decrease as construction meets the new demand.

Final Thoughts

Remote and hybrid work models are no longer just temporary trends. 

People from different age groups now regularly switch between working from home and the office, enjoying more flexibility and saving money.

However, only some have equal access to remote work, and some still doubt its effectiveness, indicating that old biases are still around. Despite this, the clear benefits of cost savings and employee retention, remote work will become more common for people of all ages. 

However, it's crucial to consciously ensure this flexibility contributes to positive societal changes rather than reinforcing existing inequalities.

Sources

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Andrea Mercado is a tech-focused journalist and copywriter with over 5 years of experience covering innovation, edtech, AI, and internet trends across media outlets. She is passionate about how technology can democratize access to education and is an avid learner when it comes to emerging tech like AI. Her articles and webinars help readers stay informed on the latest tech developments.
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